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EXHIBITIONS


Mes Bêtes Sauvages, 2008
Ma Poufiasse, 2012

SOLO SHOWS

Folles de leur corps / Crazy about their bodies
Café Gallery Projects London, 8 October to 9 November, 2014
The exhibition opens with the five short texts of Le Lever, torn from an auction catalogue description of an engraving after a painting by Pierre-Antoine Baudouin, the son-in-law of Boucher, who, like his father-in-law, depicted the voluptuous eroticism of the ancien régime, transformed into chapters. The servant girl kneels before her mistress, holding her satin mule. Stuffed animals (aristocratic greedy squirrels who take everything for themselves, a mob of Jacobin stoats, sporting Phrygian bonnets, cunning radical foxes who have read Marx) proliferate. In La Forme-valeur, Marx's Capital is read, chapter three on exchange-value, in an attempt to find a woman speaking, yet all is found is an object speaking in the charming voice of a commodity in the chorus of goods going to market. Scent bottles (Allure) might become Molotov cocktails, the material that may be soaked and ignited is French wedding tulle, which is rather expensive. The repetitive (and as the artist is the first to admit, dull and amateur) films of Mes coquetteries follow silk-clad bodies while a voiceover recalls the radio transmissions of the Resistance and from the Underworld via the car radio of Cocteau's film Orphée. In Encore un effort a banner carries the breathless descriptions of the new fashions for 1968, when anything goes and details place the accent on this or that part of the body and its adornment: a pair of shoes that have come off in a struggle, for example, the heel of one snapped off; a checked shirt, with two buttons undone; a light-coloured trench coat (perfect for a May day); a blouson- style jacket that allows easy freedom of movement; pale casual slacks worn with an ankle boot. Beauty is in the streets as fashion becomes democratic (or so say the houses of haute couture), while the philosopher of the boudoir extorts us once again to take action. To an assembled crowd of sensitive men and women, which petit-maître or dangerous man of principles would suggest that the only moral system to reinforce political revolution is that of libertinage, the revenge of nature's course against the aberrations of society? The exhibition included a performance of fourteen women, an Agit-disco from Stefan Szczelkun, Chris Gibson as librarin-in residence, an outpost of Artwords bookshop, with selected titles, a reading room for some of Kivland's library, a small but rich publication, and a screening of the full-length version of Peter Watkins' film La Commune (Paris 1871) at Sands Film Club in Bermondsey.

Femmes folles de leur corps
Galerie Bugdahn und Kaimer, Düsseldorf, 23 November 2013 to 18 January 2014
In a footnote in Capital, chapter 2: The Process of Exchange, Marx writes:
'In the twelfth century [...], very delicate things often appear among these commodities. Thus a French poet [Guillot de Paris] of the period enumerates among the commodities to be found in the fair of Lendit, alongside clothing, shoes, leather, implements of cultivation, skins, etc., also " femmes folles de leur corps".' The English translator translates this as 'wanton women'; I would rather translate it as 'women crazy about their body'.

Reproductions II
DOMOBAAL, 3 John Street, London WC1N 2ES
18.01.13 – 16.02.13
Saturday 16 February: on the final afternoon of the exhibition a series of special events took place in the gallery
[download events programme)
In Reproductions II Sharon Kivland exhibits new works from the collection, echoing her last exhibition, with a little deviation. Works include postcards of Rome turned into clumsy negatives; more carefully done drawings of underwear, copied from magazines of the 1950s, immobile and fixed, removed from any supporting body; photographs of belts or waists, bodies or fashion accessories (so difficult to tell sometimes); a knee–length skirt, which appears both constraining and oddly liberating; truncated bodies in attractive trousers and defining belts or in lovely dresses (day and one evening); postcards of stars of the cinema, already fading, embellished (the painted addition may be all that remains); another Nana, ghostwritten this time, describing herself through the words of others. It is, one might say, a matter of structure, as well as one of meticulous cataloguing or insistent representation. Material that has had a life already is reorganised, yet the re–ordering leads to a certain disorder, a somewhat paradoxical economy. It may be rather hard to distinguish perversity from perversion, for example, in certain works (re)presented here, wherein there is both malice and jouissance.


Mes filles I & II

Ma Nana (encore), autres filles et quelques petits explosions
Galerie des petits carreaux, 43 rue des Petits Carreaux, 75002 Paris
17.11.12 – 5.01.13

Donc partout ce rose, d’une douceur trompeuse, celui des culottes chinées dans les vide greniers du coin, des dessins de soutien-gorge au crayon de couleurs, des photos de mode sur fond rose, des petites bouteilles de parfum, objets précieux dont s’exhale une inquiétante tulle en forme de fumée rose. Et puis la violence des trophées de chasse : une ravissante tête de biche accrochée au mur porte au cou un délicieux ruban rouge, comme la trace d’une décapitation.Car on ne s’y trompe pas longtemps, la « chair » de ce rose est une chair blessée, comme la chair de Nana l’est par les regards de convoitise qui la réduisent à l’état de marchandise. Le roman de Zola et son person- nage éponyme ont dans l’œuvre de Sharon Kivland une résonance particulière. Le texte de Zola est traité comme un matériau que l’artiste retravaille par des réécritures. Et le personnage de Nana, image hyper- trophiée de la féminité, y tient une place emblématique.

Un vent de révolution, Centre d'art Passerelle, 18 May to 18 August, 41 rue Charles Bertholet, Brest, www.cac-passerelle.com
Curated by Ulrike Kremeier, and exhibiting lovely dresses, delightful bonnets, literate animals, and moments of surprising violence.

Un vent de révolution - Dossier de presse (pdf)

A review of Un vent de révolution (pdf)

Sharon Kivland. Amateur and Collector
IDEAS Store Whitechapel, London
December to January 2011–12
Curated by Sotiris Kyriacou

For many years now Sharon Kivland has produced books and objects; the former range from small artist’s books to larger books in bigger print runs, though she is far from a best-seller; the latter are sometimes multiples in limited or even unlimited editions (in one case, at least).  Kivland employs the movement and displacement of ideas, words, images, and objects. Connections are woven in series, using strategies of appearances, disguise, impersonation, subtle dialogues, intimate suggestion, and a lack of historical fixity. There is a light touch, an irreverent approach to established values, in works that address education, identity, work, desire, and liberty. The exhibition has the form of a museum display, using three vitrines to lay out her wares and history in attractive display, and in addition, a text work for the wall, in which Zola’s novel Nana is abridged according to light and lighting effects, including metaphor. Each book or object will be accompanied by a new text, which both describes what is on display and suggests its part in a larger narrative. Works will include her re-working of fashion plates from 1848 and their descriptions; engraved lorgnettes, a magnifying glass, and a pocket mirror; ; a set of tropes for the use of authors; and a selection of books, including her venture into the holidays of Sigmund Freud.  There are also be objects and images from Kivland’s considerable archive/collection, which frequently provokes an idea or work. This includes cards for communion, photographs of confirmations, a wedding wreath, postcards of bathers, and pierrot/pierrettes. Kivland is a collector (which is self-evident), an amateur (in the sense of that a lover of/a person of taste for something/s, of which s/he has a certain knowledge as well as appreciation — one may also think of something that is practised for pleasure rather than for gain), and above all, a reader.

I am sick of my thoughts
DomoBaal, London
March to April 2011

Mes Negligées, watercolour and Indian ink on Canson paper,printed text on pages from old school exercise books, 2009–11
Photograph: Andy Keate

These are studio works, including works on paper, prints, photographs, and watercolours, made over the last two years in a state of malaise. They are works of interrupted thought. The artist writes that she is sick of her thoughts, and copies her son's concordance as he observes 'elle est malade de ses pensées'. A photograph of a woman lying back, her hair falling in an unlikely mass is countered by a text work in which Zola's novel Nana (a favourite recourse of the artist) has been digested according to light and lighting effects, including those of metaphor. It ends with the line: The hair, the beautiful hair, still blazed like sunlight and flowed in a stream of gold. Nana is a grotesque corpse at the end of the novel, and it is true that the photograph has an unhealthy cast. The artist practices her limited skills in watercolour, copying carte de voeux, which show the similar scene of snow, a river or stream, a forest, a village. She looks at the banal image for a long time, committing it to memory, then turns it over to look at it no longer, rendering then what she imagines was pictured overleaf. The watercolours are framed with their original, reversed to show the message, a wish for health, for a lovely year. These, she will say, are her good years. 1968 was a good year, too, and she is equally fond of 1848, 1871, and some years in the 1950s, working from her collection of French women's magazines, published at particular moments of insurrection or social change. Pictures are isolated from their backgrounds, reprinted, then coloured as faithfully as possible according to their original colour, which becomes a strange 'maquillage', or indeed, in Joan Riviere's term, a masquerade. And masquerade is a play on the imaginary, subject to the market of sexuality, which masks the object. They become grotesque, even though she tries to work as carefully as possible, really doing her very best not to spoil them, like a teenage girl in her bedroom (colouring in her idealised drawings of what she may wish to become). She stops when she finds herself applying too much colour, in too garish a shade, but a discrete application seems sadly insufficient. Nonetheless, she arrests herself at the point of violence to the image. A supposedly enticing picture (a woman lifting her hand to her face, turning her head, her hair flicking back in the other hand), however banal, is very easily turned into something ugly and clumsy, yet retains or reconstitutes a horrible attraction. It is monstrous, of course, in its overdone appearance of femininity, and each betrays something in its intersection with history. She imagines that her works are made with both care and taste, that they are discretely knowing with just a soupçon of intellectual quality, moderated by a soft, persuasive voice, with a harmony of style and discourse. Catherine Elkar writes of Kivland's work:

Sharon Kivland, l'artiste qui lit et convoque dans son travail á la fois de grands auteurs des siècles passés – Rousseau et Mallarmé, Laclos et Zola, Freud et Diderot, Benjamin et Marx – et de plus anonymes scribes, tisse des extraits de leurs textes avec des images glanées ici ou là, dans des ouvrages pour dames, des manuels ménagers, des cartes postales parfois » fleur bleue «, ainsi qu'avec des objets réunis au fil du temps, grâce au concours d'un réseau amical, à la fréquentation assidue des vide greniers et des sites de vente en ligne. Le rapport qu'elle établit entre le texte et l'image et/ou l'objet est d'une précision subreptice en ce qu'il ne s'articule ni sur des oppositions brutales, ni sur des anachronismes faciles.

Je suis malade de mes pensées, pencil drawing on Arches Velin, 2011


La dormeuse (red), print mounted on aluminium, 2011

Reproductions
AMT_Project, Bratislava
February–March 2011, curated by Alberto Matteo Torri
Guest artist: Benjamin Swaim
See the following http://artycok.tv/lang/cs-cz/reproductions/7226 for a short and somewhat embarrassing interview.


Mes plus belles (1968), 2011


Mes plus belles (bretonnes), 2011

Recent works that draw on Kivland's archive of magazines, prints, publicity leaflets or objects, and advertising from different eras. Working with reproductions that are in their turn reproduced and reworked, Kivland’s approach is that of the amateur and collector, doing her very best with diligence and dedication. There is affection as much as irony in the works, often displayed in the titles which reveal appropriation and the claiming of possession. She invited French artist Benjaim Swaim to exhibit with her, and there were many conversations.


Mes buvards, 2010, and Le cri de la soie, 2011


Mes plus belles coiffures, 2011

Mes plus belles
Le Sphinx
Paris, April 2010

Il y aura des roses et des femmes, coupées délicatement, flottantes, privées de tout contexte. Il y aura des femmes bien coiffées, sorties de leur époque, redessinées et peintes. Il y aura des signes, des yeux baissés, de la lingerie, dont les lignes et couleurs seront modifiés. Ces œuvres sont tantôt des séries ou des travaux en cours qui produisent des collections (de journaux, de cartes postales) avec un mélange d’insouciance et de gravité. Les œuvres sont détachés, frivoles, elles sont souvent négligées. Les œuvres sont sérieuses, austères, souvent solennelles et circonspectes. L’écrivain, Danielle Robert-Guédon a souligné l’importance dans le travail de Sharon Kivland des décalages sémantiques et l’insistance sur « les symboles fétichistes qui constituent souvent des figures du désir », comme elle l’écrit aussi « les images et les mots sont inséparables, revenant comme une obsession  d’ouvertures : fenêtres, jambes, façades, visages ».

There will be roses and women, cut carefully from their ground, floating and bereft of context. There will be coiffed women taken out of their time, refigured and painted. There will be gestures, downcast eyes, and lingerie, cut to another form and colour. These are works in series and works in progress, which draw on collections (of journals and postcards) with insouciance and gravity. The works are detached and frivolous, frequently negligent or carefree. The works are serious and austere, frequently solemn or circumspect. The writer Danielle Robert-Guédon has remarked on ‘a semantic discrepancy and an insistence on fetishistic symbols which often constitute figures of desire. Images and words are inseparable, returning as an obsession of openings: windows, legs, facades, faces’, in Kivland’s work.



Reisen
Bugdahn & Kaimer, Düsseldorf
October–December 2009


I exhibited some dreams of Rome, several Swiss hotels, the steam of trains as we journey (our hearts turn to the south), the snow on mountain peaks and the water of mountain lakes, and watercolours (from memory) of landscapes that have never existed, coupled with best wishes for a new year. I am particularly fond of the last, despite their incompetent rendering, which I cannot simply blame on my lack of recall.

Quels seraient les meilleurs moyens de perfectionner l’éducation des femmes?CIAC, Pont-Aven
October to November 2009
Curated by Catherine Elkar



Mes semblances, 2002/2009


We have seen nothing yet but roses, 2008 to present

I exhibited some old works and some new, including a series of letters, or rather their last lines, from Denis Diderot to Sophie Volland, my ABC of faults, and one may consider the ensemble as between a school room and a boudoir, mediated by the constant figure of the libertine. Several texts circulate about the work, by Catherine Elkar, Brigitte Charpentier, and Danielle Robert-Guédon, who is kind enough to note that I am neither hermetic nor obscure:

Il serait vain de tenter une classification, de vouloir assigner des propos définitifs à l'oeuvre de Sharon Kivland. Non que cette oeuvre soit hermétique ou obscure, bien au contraire, mais le bloc des connaissances préexistant à l'aboutissement est si dense que le moindre fil tiré de l'écheveau entraîne un infini questionnement. Tout au moins, pouvons-nous aborder ce travail en considérant la notion de 'déplacements', qu'il s'agisse d'errance, de détours, de passages ou bien de métaphores, d'ellipses et de métonymies.

A short guide by Brigitte Charpentier. pdf


A Wind of Revolution Blows, the Storm is on the Horizon
Chelsea Space, London
November to December, 2008
Curated by Donald Smith

The title comes from Alexis de Tocqueville, speaking in the Chamber of Deputies,shortly before the outbreak of revolution across Europe in 1848. Karl Marx, in The Eighteenth Brumaire, responding to the events and effects of 1848, writes: ‘Men make their own history, but they do not make it as they please; they do not make it under self-selected circumstances, but under circumstances existing already, given and transmitted from the past’. The works here, despite their gentle air of refinement, reflect relays between nature, humanity, violence, and sexuality.

Does the wind of history flutter through the leaves of fashion journals of past centuries? Can the details or even the outlines of those explosions of class struggle—such as the bourgeois revolutions of 1848 or the libertarian social experiment of the Paris Commune of 1871—be read in the details and the outlines of past fashion? Such details and outlines have been snapped up and out of history for these reworked fashion plates. These reworkings came into being through an arduous manual labour of reproduction that is itself outmoded. These ephemera are not simply recovered, but remade. Fashion and its accoutrements are recovered as repetitive labour, reinforcing the repetitions and the labours that structure fashion itself, an eternal return of the ever same in the guise of the new. Perhaps we can discover in these re-fabrications, if not also in the originals, a small feature that betrays, in the vocabulary of fashion, the ructions of history: maybe a red ribbon necklace remembers the slice of the Guillotine. Then again, en revers, like shot silk, the cut out, blacking all details, might be an abstraction that reveals all the more blindingly the hidden lining of fashion’s frivolity, a transference of its deadly drive: in the outlines of headgear, perhaps, the contours of liberty caps. Here are women, at least in ideal form, their heads gently turned to reveal the faux-vitality of the fakest of pinkest cheeks. The fashion plates insert them graphically into commodity relations. Their negation as silhouette in the copied version apes the invisibility of the female hands and bodies whose labour made their beautiful trappings. Their heightened colouration draws attention to the ways in which fashion disguises and embellishes and leads women into the realm of artifice. Her nature is no longer nature, but historical because commodified. History does shudder through the folds in more or less invisible ways and pastiche teases it out, or at least beckons it to sashay a while. Violence now disguises and now parades itself when the cut is the deepest of things and the hang is to die for.

Esther Leslie, 2008, from A Wind of Revolution Blows, the Storm in on the Horizon,published on the occasion of the eponymous exhibition at CHELSEA Space, London.

Mon abécédaire
Sleeper, Edinburgh
March to April, 2008


I have worked hard on my embroidery, starting with anguish, passing through despair, narcissism, discharge of duty, and completing my work with zeal. I have learnt to sew in cross-stitch, counting the threads on an open weave of linen, trying to achieve a uniform appearance and an even size. I have separated my strands of red silk carefully, teasing them out to avoid snarling. I have worked the serifs of my words in stem-stitch, working from left to right so my thread emerges to the
left of the previous stitch. I have drawn out each word with a soft pencil, shading with care on new scraps of linen, then worked through the cloth, which subsequently must be pulled away, thread by thread, to leave my imperfections. Like any child who wants to be good, who wants to set a good example, I have addressed my faults, my flaws, my defects. I have worked my list of odious self-knowledge on French hankerchiefs of lawn and lace, collected over several years. They are now given up to my task of self-analysis (helped in part by constant address to Laplanche and Pontalis’ Vocabulaire de la psychanalyse, a standard encyclopaedic reference work for psychoanalysis). I have made an example of myself. I have embroidered my alphabet, and now I may demonstrate my knowledge, my industry, and my virtue. This is my abécédaire, designed to teach the most elementary lessons, and it is witness to my dexterity. Mon abécédaire is a classic work of self-education, and I have worked hard all year.

mon angoisse
mon besoin
mon conflit
mon désespoir
mon effroi
mon fantasme
mon gâchage
mon heurt
mon impuissance
mon jugement
mon lapsus
mon manque
mon narcissisme
mon orgeuil
mon purisme
mon quitus
mon refoulement
mon stratagème
mon transfert
mon usage
mon verbalisme
mon zèle

 

Natural Education
Bast'art, Bratislava
2008

 

What does Jean-Jacques Rousseau tell us? He says that we are born weak, that we are born stupid, without judgement; unprovided for, we need aid. This aid will come to us from education, which will cultivate us like plants. Self-reliant, observant of the world around us, we will learn the consequences of liberty, of choice. Removed from the corrupting effects of society, we will move back to our natural state, like the wild girl of the woods of Champagne; we will not follow rules; rather, we will learn from the consequences of our actions, and later, we may read literature and philosophy, when we have developed the capacity to judge.Like Emile, Sharon Kivland lives in the French countryside, though going frequently to London for discussion on philosophy, politics, and psychoanalysis. She remarks that Jean-Jacques, despite his many fine qualities, despite his declarations on moral and political equality, has a rather different programme of education for girls (of which she rather disapproves, for she cannot find a place there for herself) so she turns instead (naturally) from Emile to Choderlos de Laclos. An admirer of Rousseau, he nonetheless advocates, with fervour, the equality of the sexes, dwelling on ‘la femme-naturelle’, for whom only a revolution can change her current condition of slavery – and where there is slavery there can be no education (he adds).
     In reflections on slavery, labour, revolution, and desire, Sharon Kivland exhibited fifteen embroidered linen robes (as worn by the wild girl of the woods of Champagne when she is domesticated perhaps? No, no, that is merely whimsical – they are the nightdresses of working girls, whatever their embroidered texts declare), and a selection of other works on her favourite subjects, including some small kidskins (a reminder of natural relations), a series of photographs of those French soaps called ‘Bonne Mere’ (so useful in the punitive insistence on good language), leather cartes de visite carrying descriptions of the transgressive body of that natural woman of the demi-monde, Nana, returned to her through a simple change in pronoun, and useful pencils and handkerchiefs, neatly contained by her son's exercise in writing.

The project was educational, but naturally so, intended to induce the convulsive laughter of noisy merriment, the expression of pleasure, and numerous contradictions.



La forme-valeur I

Galerie du Cloître, ERBA, Rennes
2005


 

 

 

 

More images of La forme-valeur I


 

 

 

La forme-valeur II
AKAU Inc.
Toronto 2006
Curated by Cheryl Sourkes

More images of La forme-valeur II

Ma Marie
2005
Framed digital print. Series of three

 

Ma Nana et autres filles
Atelier Marcel Dinahet, Rennes
2005
A gentle and refined display of three embroidered gowns, three embroidered handkerchiefs, eight lovely cartes de visite embossed on fair calfskin with a dizzying description of Zola's Nana (in which 'elle' is replaced with 'je' and 'sa', son', and 'ses' with 'ma', mon', and 'mes), and three prints, like the one above, a detail of a chromograph of an actress or the Blessed Virgin Mary (you decide).

Mes fils
ongoing
c-type photographs mounted on aluminium, matt laminate, 80cm diam.

Mes fils
DomoBaal, London
2005

Mes Fils, from which the exhibition takes its title, includes a continuing series of photographs, each showing the same woman in an embrace with a different man. Closer inspection reveals that the woman is much older than her partner, old enough, in fact, to be his mother. The work engages with the Oedipus complex and its resolution in prohibition, when the son must renounce his desire for his mother. The way in which each child navigates his passage through the Oedipal relation will determine both his assumption of a sexual position and his choice of sexual object. For the psychoanalyst Jacques Lacan, it is a passage to the symbolic, one that passes through a complex sexual dialectic. Here no father intervenes, however, to impose his law and to separate mother from child. The scandal is evident, and there is a further underlying transgression in the work. As the series continues, the woman - the artist - gets older while the men (all former students, I am sorry to say) remain the same age. They are, however, completely interchangeable, while she is constant and singular. In the same series are several other works that also take up the themes of prohibition and transgression in an atmosphere of elegant refinement.

Cela aura déjà eu lieu
Château de Morsang-sur-Orge, France
2005

See a short video of Cela aura déjà eu lieu

Un calendrier revolutionnaire
2003
12 c-type photographs, coloured archival board, letterpress printed, each with the name of a month in the French Revolutionary Calendar, Each month features an ugly little burn scar, acquired usually in the course of daily labour, until the moment I decided to make the work and then had to burn myself deliberately. What an odious task in 2003.

 


L'autre corps
Galerie Bugdahn & Kaimer, Düsseldorf
2003

Le bonheur des femmes

Le bonheur de femmes (the scent of a woman), consists of photographs hung at genital height. They are of women's feet, taken in the perfume departments of Parisian grands magasins. Texts mounted at eye-level -- such as 'envy', 'obsession', 'allure', and so on -- might be identified as the names of scents.

While the work alludes to nineteenth-century Paris, consumerism and the urban experience, it really begins with an encounter between Freud and Marx at the site of the fetish. While Marx borrows the term to demonstrate how social relations take on the illusory form of relationships between things, Freud applies it to sexual behaviour, when excitement depends on the presence of an object. All this is standard stuff, but what if the object disappears, like faint waft of scented air? Or, furthermore, if it disappears into words, transforming a shine on the nose to a glance at the nose perhaps (sniffing all the time), then there is an indication that fetishism is more than a vague analogy in the visual field, it is something subject to linguistic transformation. One might say that the very words are perfumed ...

24-part photographic work with text. C-prints mounted on aluminium, matt laminated

2002
Centre Culturel, Ploufragan, France
Hôtel de Ville, Guingamp, France

2001
Galeria La Centrale, Montreal, Canada
Le Triangle, Rennes, France

2000
Portfolio, Edinburgh, and Galerie VU, Quebec City, Canada (as part of Manifestation, internationel biennale of contemporary art)

Mes Péripatéticiennes
The Economist Building, Contemporary Arts Society projects, London


A View from a Distance
Harewood House, Leeds
1999

Mes folies
1998
c-type colour photo mounted behind engraved glass
25 x 19.5 cm

 

Wigmore Fine Art, London

'A central preoccupation in the work of Sharon Kivland is the circulation of desire. The artist sets up scenarios and narratives which are activated by a discrepancy between desire and its fulfillment. Often, the pleasure of looking is articulated through a combination of exquisite, highly wrought and pristine objects and photographs, which are coupled with less wholesome inscriptions and images which jar with the superficial elegance and ostentation. The viewer is drawn in by the promise of seduction, only at some point to be jolted and confronted by the colloquialisms and unrequited absences of baser desires'.
Sotiris Kyriacou


La valeur d'échange
, Centre d'Art Contemporain, Rueil-Malmaison
(catalogue)
1998

 

 


The School for Lovers

Touring exhibition, Site Gallery, Sheffield and Bonington Gallery, Nottingham (catalogue)

Mes Folies, Galerie Behemot, Prague
Mes Tendresses, Gallery TPW, Toronto

1997
Des femmes et de la propriéte, Site Départmentale de Dourven, Bretagne, commissioned installation, catalogue published by
Filigrane éditions
Rapport Sexuel, installation of video at Gender and Sexuation conference, organised by The European School of Psychoanalysis, Brunei Gallery, University of London

1996
Je sais bien mais quand même, Musée des Beaux Arts, Reims

Letters of the Blind
Gallery 101, Ottawa, Canada (publication)
1996

1995
Mes Tendresses, Raum fuer Neue Kunst, Zürich

1994
Cent Femmes, Gallery JNJ, Prague
J'appelle un chat un chat, The Library, Bookworks, London
J'appelle un chat un chat, YYZ, Toronto
Mais quand même, Stadtaustellunghalle von Hawerkampf, Münster
Aphonia, CAPC, St. Fons (publication)
Je sais bien, Hales Gallery, London

1993
Jeu d'esprit, Apollohuis, Eindhoven

1992
A Bout de Souffle, Dazibao, Montreal
Coup de Foudre, Credac, Ivry-sur-Seine (publication)
L'attente...l'oubli, New Loom House, London, commissioned by Book Works

1991
L'une sans l'autre, Les Ateliers Nadar, Marseille (text published to accompany exhibition)
Chimera, Aspex gallery, Portsmouth
The Fire of Tongues, Ikon Gallery, Birmingham (publication)

1990
The Blind Daughter, The Showroom, London
Je me souviens, Lebel Gallery, Windsor, Canada
Crossing with silver, Whitechapel Art Gallery, London
In place of the heart, Athens Biennale of Photography

1989
The Conversion of Pleasure into Sickness, Usher Art Gallery, Lincoln

1988
Purgo et Ornat, Academy of Fine Art, Den Haag, Netherlands

1987
Houses and Paths of Dreams, MOMA, Oxford
A Trouble Shared, Riverside Studios, London
The Conversion of Pleasure into Sickness, Chapter Arts Centre, Cardiff and Kettle's Yard, Cambridge (publication)

1986
Washing Lines
, Mile End Automatic Laundry, London
Tired and Thirsty, Photogaleriet, Oslo
The vessel/held, Spitalfields Health Centre, commissioned by Whitechapel Art Gallery, London

1985
Salon de Jeunes Artistes, Centre Georges Pompidou, Paris

1978
AIR Gallery, London

GROUP SHOWS AND OTHER EVENTS(also see PROJECTS)

2014

Repetition as an ongoing state of change & Reframing extant material
Johan Deumens gallery, Amsterdam, December
Transparences
The summer exhibition at Galerie des petits carreaux, St-Briac, August



Galerie Bugdahn und Kaimer at ART COLOGNE
Thursday 10 to Sunday 13 April 2014
A meeting of books and related works, at Johan Deumens gallery
Gabriel Metsustraat 8, 2e etage, Amsterdam, Netherlands
BOOK LAUNCH AND FILM SCREENING:
TEGEL: SPECULATIONS AND PROPOSITIONS
April 2014
Verein zur Förderung von Kunst und Kultur am Rosa-Luxemburg-Platz e.V., Berlin
Including: Peter Adey, Sean Ashton, Michelle Atherton, Dian Bauer, Amanda Beech, Federica Bueti, Maja Ciric, Jamie Crewe, Nick Crowe & Ian Rawlinson, Bryan Eccleshall, Elke Falat, Stella Flatten, Hondartza Fraga, Rachel Garfield, Margarita Gluzberg, Julian Gough, Robert Gschwantner, Giorgio Cappozzo, Jane Harris, Gill Hobson, Janet Hodgson, Dale Holmes, Kerstin Honeit, Ben Hope, Stephan Hüsch, Jaspar Joseph-Lester, Karl Heinz Jeron, Renata Kaminska, Natasja Keller, Sharon Kivland, Jon Klein, Liane Lang, Jeff Luckey, TC McCormack, Ashley Metz, Karina Nimmerfall, Irene Pätzug, Amy Patton, Susanne Prinz, Boris Riedel, Miguel Santos, Gary Simmonds, Robert Partridge, Águeda Simó, Joachim Stein, Ricarda Vidal, Julie Westerman
'Almost but not quite'
A group exhibition at Galerie Bugdahn und Kaimer, Düsseldorf
31 January to 22 March, 2014 -- works that are rather like paintings .
'The postcard is a public work of art'
A group exhibition curated by Jeremy Cooper, at X Marks the Bökship, London, in January to March

2013
'Cousu Main (couture piqûre, suture, blessure)'
Galerie des petits carreaux, Paris
Carolle Bénitah, Lydie Chamaret,Sharon Kivland, Andoni Maillard,
Livia Marin, Sophie Menuet, Solmaz Panahi et Pooya Abbasian,
Françoise Quardon, Zoé Rumeau, Ana Catalina Vicuna.
17October to 5 December
‘Reading as a Contemporary Art’, ICA London
Friday Salon 5 July , 1.00 to 6.00 p.m.
An event conceived by Sarah Wood, with Forbes Morlock, Steve Benson and Clare Connors, Kate Briggs, Brian Dillon, Hester Reeve, Peter Jaegar, Nicholas Royle, Sarah Wood, and Sharon Kivland
Nana, again and again
‘Punctuations, Separations & Artists’ Books’
Eagle Gallery/EMH Arts, London
June to July
Revolutionary furniture, a whiff of the Terror, and some unsolved Charaden
‘Resort’
Nick Carrick, Paul Greenleaf, Sharon Kivland at Transition Gallery, London
22.06.13 – 14.07.13
A new modest book: Reisen, der Rauch von Dampflokomotiven, a book of the smoke of steam trains, some Swiss hotels, more trains, snow on Alpine peaks, and the limpid waters of mountain lake
‘Ulysses, l'autre mer’
Celebrating 30 years of FRAC Bretagne, France, curated by Marcel Dinahet, Catherine Elkar, and Jean–Marc Huitorel at three venues:
 Musée d'Art et d'Histoire de Saint–Brieuc, Brittany, France
17.05.13 – 25.08.13
Musée de compagnie des Indes, Lorient, Brittany, France
08.06.13 – 23.09.13
FRAC, Rennes, Brittany, France
17.05.13 – 25.08.13
Reproductions I in:
‘A Book is a Performance’, an exhibition co–curated with Lisa Otty, Duncan of Jordanstone College of Art & Design, Centre for Artists' Books
25.04.13 – 26.05.13
'Interdit aux mineurs'
Exposition collective sur le dessin avec Pooya Abbasian, Léa Bénétou, Amélie Bucher, Pierre Budet, Miguel Egaña, Nikolas Fouré, Sharon Kivland, Yvan Le Bozec, Joachim Monvoisin et Lorena Roco
Galerie des petits carreaux, Paris
11.04.13 – 24.04.13
Enrichissements de la collection 2011/12- 'images/images of images/no images'
Centre des livres d'artistes (CdLA), St-Yrieix-le-Perche, France
Jean-Marc Berguel, Alain Bernardini, Christian Boltanski, Ernst Caramelle, Philippe Clerc, Céline Duval, Hans-Peter Feldmann, Rinata Kajumova & Achim Riecher, Sharon Kivland, Sol LeWitt, John McDowall, Roberto Martinez, Maurizio Nannucci, Hubert Renard, Edward Ruscha & Lawrence Weiner, Joachim Schmid, Andreas Schmidt, Erik Steinbrecher, Taroop & Glabel, Endre Tót, Jan Dirk van der Burg, Éric Watier.
16 March to 29 June
' Invitation à l'imaginaire'
Imagerie, Lannion, France
19 January to 20 March
Richard Artschwager, Iain Baxter, Amy Bessone, Hannah Collins, Anne Deleporte, Larry Deyab, Bruno Di Rosa, Dominique Figarella, Hreinn Fridfinnsson, Etienne Hajdu,Thomas Huber, Serge Jamet, Joana Hadjithomas/Khalil Joreige, Sharon Kivland, Harald Klingelhöller, Hervé Lemasson, Etienne Pressager, Sigurdur Arni Sigurdsson, David Zérah

2012
'A kind of huh?'
Médiathèque des Abbatoirs, Toulouse, 8 November 2012 to 23 March 2013
'Sense of Place in Artist Books'
Architecture & Landscape Architecture Library, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, USA, curated by Karen Kinoshita
'Lessons in History Volume II – Democracy'
Grahame Gallery and Editions, Brisbane, Australia, September–October 201
'Jaunes', a group exhibition at Galerie des petits carreaux, Paris, 28 June to 8 September
Pooya Abbasian, Léa Bénétou,  Jean-Yves Brelivet, Pierre Budet, Ron Haselden, Chang-Yu Hsu, Athina Ioannou,  Isabelle Jobard,  Sharon Kivland, Yvan Le Bozec, Gilles Mahé, Joachim Monvoisin, Delfina Reis Renck,  John Timberlake,  Yves Trémorin
‘Surfaces: Works on Paper’, a group exhibition by AMBruno arts collective, curated by Steve Perfect and John McDowall, at Sput+Nik Gallery, Porto, Portugal, 16 June to 28 July
‘Tegel: Flights of Fancy’
Kino Babylon, Berlin
‘Double Vision’
Galerie Bugdahn & Kaimer, Düsseldorf
'Forget-me-not',Galerie Elika, Athens, curated by Supermina
www.elikagallery.com


Mes bonnes années, 2011, watercolours and postcards

Mes nœuds, 2012, antique lawn handkerchiefs, embroidered with the names of knots, such as the delightful cul de porc

Having amnesia as the core, the artists locate and recall the void of erased memory, through a personal, social, cultura,l and political context.
Vanessa Anastassopoulou, Martha Dimitropoulou, Katerina Diakomi, Sharon Kivland, Maro Michalakakos, Eleini Mouzakiti, Kostas Bassanos, Yorgos Papadatos, Nina Papaconstantinou, Eftihis Patsourakis, Eleni Froudaraki
'Replay' , Galerie de Dourven, Trédez-Loquémeau
'MAKING SPACE'
Exploring creative and research processes through dialogue, curation and EXHIBITION.Investigating their intersection with psychoanalysis through CONFERENCE: Psychoanalysis and Artistic Process – A day of dialogues between artists and psychoanalysts: Grayson Perry, Martin Creed, Sharon Kivland (artists), Valerie Sinason, Kenneth Wright, Lesley Caldwell (psychoanalysts)
Saturday 25th February 2012, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Cruciform Lecture Theatre 1, Gower Street, London
https://makingspace.eventbrite.co.uk/
'Hostings 6: Absence – Haunted Landscapes'
An evening of interdisciplinary talks and presentations exploring the desire to  materialise what is absent through the medium of haunted landscapes.
29 February, 6.30p.m. to 9 p.m.
The Court Room, First Floor,  Senate House South Block, University of London
'X = or what is to be done'
As one of the twenty artists shortlisted (and one of the ten winners) for X=or what is to be done, a project to celebrate the ten-year anniversary of the bookartbookshop, my pamphlet Les devises manquantes (The Missing Slogans) was exhibited at the RED Gallery, 1–3 Rivington St, London
www.redgallerylondon.com
www.bookartbookshop.com

2011
'Encounters', group exhibition at Galerie Bugdhan & Kaimer, Düsseldorf, February to March
'Why do I keep reading the same books?', AMT_Project, Bratislvay to September 2011, curated by Petra Feriancova, exhibiting David Raymond Conroy, Dorota Kenderová, Sharon Kivland, Jirka Thyn, Jaro Varga, and Anabela Zigov.
'Text and Image', Galerie Bugdahn und Kaimer, Düsseldorf, June to August 2011, exhibiting Robert Barry, Peter Hutchinson, Sharon Kivland, Jürgen Klauke, Marie-Jo Lafontaine, Thomas Ruff, and Ingolf Timpner
'Sequences', 2011, Johan Deumens Gallery, Haarlem – a group exhibition in a beautiful house (so I am told) in Herengracht, Amsterdam.
Le cri de la soie, artist's project for Cahiers intempestifs, 2011, St-Etienne, France
'Les paris sont ouverts', Freud Museum, London. curated by Caroline May
July to September. The title of this exhibition can be literally translated as ‘the bets are open’, while a looser translation suggests that ‘everything is possible, anything can happen’. The exhibition addressed the idea of openness and possibility in gender and sexuality. I continued my concerns with the Oedipal drama and transference, , exploring the crucial role played by maternal/filial relations in shaping notions of sexual orientation, underlining the complexity of family relations. For the work entitled Mon fils, I paid my then fifteen year- old son to copy indexical references to mother-son relations in the work of Sigmund Freud, which he wrote in pen and ink in old French school exercise books, line after line as though it were a cruel punishment.

Screening of Sharon Kivland: Reisen, three very short films: The limpid waters of mountain lakes, The snow on alpine peaks, The smoke of steam trains, in ‘Freud’s Holiday’ at Freud’s Dreams Museum, St Petersburg, Russia; an event to commemorate twelve years of the museum’s  work, which opened on the 100th anniversary of The Interpretation of Dreams (4 November, 1899).
www.freud.ru
PROJECT 101.VIDEO INSTALLATION BY AMBRUNO at THE LAB, 5 to 25 November, New York
101 was initiated by Sophie Loss. The project was developed and co-ordinated by Sophie Loss and John McDowall.

2010
'The Perverse Library', Shandy Hall, Coxwold, Yorkshire, September to October,
'Super Farmers' Market', Handel Street Projects, 18 June to 17 July, curated by MaryAnne Francis and Lucy Heyward
'Sophisticated Boom Boom (in B& W)', D OMOBAAL, London, May to June 'elles@pompidou, Centre Georges Pompidou, Paris, June 2009 to June 2010, curated by Camille Morineau
'The Perverse Library', Shandy Hall, Coxwold, Yorkshire, September to October, curated by Simon Morris

2009
'A Riese', curated by Imi Maufe, Galleri Vox, Bergen, Norway
'Time is a sausage', September 2009 to January 2010. Group exhibition at domobaal, London, including a solo project and book: Freud and the Gift of Flowers (with Forbes Morlock) – I showed the floral tributes Freud did not receive and five Freudian riddles and their five answers, sadly unrelated.
The London Art Book Fair– four solo displays: Sharon Kivland/Lucy Pawlak/John Strutton/domobaal editions
Whitechapel Gallery, London
'U235 deuxième', CdLA, Saint-Yrieix-le-Perche
'Afterwards', Mead Gallery, Warwick Arts Centre, Coventry, curated by Sharon Kivland, with works by Etienne Bossut, Pavel Büchler, Hans Coper, Le Corbusier, Juan Cruz, Gareth Fisher, Rodney Graham, Lucy Harrison, Jaspar Joseph-Lester, Selma Makela, Bevis Martin & Charlie Youle, Simon Morris, Sergei Pankejeff, Alexander Ponomarev, Eric Ravilious, Lucie Rie, Jean-Jacques Rullier, John Stezaker, Benjamin Swaim, John Timberlake, and Julie Westerman. The exhibition also includes two very fine drawings, by Francis Fowler and Francis Baptiste Haselden, some lovely objects from the Freud Museum, London, and a modest yet attractive and interesting selection of books, prints, and poscards.

2008
'Parallax', curated by Richard Ducker, Fieldgate Gallery, London

2003
'Nature and Nation: Vaster than Empires', curated by Anne Eggebert and Polly Gould

2002
Filigrane Editions at Paris Photo

2001
Centième, Salon Paris Photo, Carrousel du Louvre, Paris
Bugdahn and Kaimer, Cologne Art Fair
Bugdahn and Kaimer, Basel Art Fair

2000
Loving at Home II, EdviksKonst och Kultur, Stockholm, Sweden
Jeux d'Amour, curated by Hybrid, at Battersea Arts Centre and Wigmore Fine Art, London and Turin Art Fair

1999
Loving at Home, Centre for Freudian Research and Analysis, London
Flop, The French Institute, Edinburgh
The Equinox, Cairn Gallery, Nailsworth (book work) Alliance Française, Lodz, Poland
Passion, Gasworks, London

1998
Forest, The Bull and Last, London
Body and Photography, The Prague House of Photography, curated by Martina Pachmanova (catalogue)
Evil: Critical Interventions
, John Hansard Gallery, Southampton

1997
Cocktail, Raum fuer Neue Kunst, Zürich
Group show, Rack Gallery, London
Fascinum, Art House, London, with Shelagh Wakely and Michelle Naismith (artists' book)

1996
Gallery artists, Raum fuer Neue Kunst, Zürich
DuSoMaclalanKiPonBruHu, CAPC, St. Fons, France (catalogue)
Dialect, The Anglican Church, via del Babuino, Rome (catalogue)
Mauvais Genre, Mois de la Photo, Reims (catalogue)
Mauvais Genre, CAPC Saint Dizier, France
Last Out, Lights Outs, Langsett School, Sheffield (artists multiple)

1995
Desiring Practices, RIBA, London (catalogue)
In Vino Veritas, The British School at Rome
Speculation, Ecole des Beaux Arts, Brest, curated by Jean-Marc Huitorel
Words, Aspex Gallery, Portsmouth

1994
Quelles hysteries?, Galerie du Cloître, Rennes, curated by Christian Gattinoni
Hermit, International symposium, Plasy, Czech Republic,
(publication)
Les Femmes, autremont, Chateau du Beaumanoir, Quintin, France
Wellspring, Bath Arts Festival, curated by Antonia Payne and
Angela Kingston (catalogue)

1993
Passage, Clove Two, London
Acer Pseudoplatanus, Sydenham Nature Reserve, curated by Gloria Carlos (catalogue)
Hermit, International symposium, Plasy, Czech Republic, (catalogue and compact disc)
Public Private: secrets must circulate, The French Institute, Edinburgh, Fotofeis, curated by Alain Reinaudo (catalogue)
Britart, Raum fuer Neue Kunst, Zürich
En Scene, W139, Amsterdam (catalogue)

1992
Britart, Galerie Bruno Bücher, Poitiers
Galerie Apunto, Amsterdam
Summer Lightning, Dreadnought Seaman's Hospital, Greenwich, London, curated by Wise/Taylor Partnership (catalogue)
Rose, Rose Court, London, curated by Wise/Taylor Partnership, (catalogue)
Annunciation, St. George's Church, Bloomsbury

1991
Après la photographie de voyage, Dazibao, Montreal

1990
Ora ti faccio vedere
, Artists at the British School of Rome (catalogue)
Rome Scholars 1980 - 90, The Royal College of Art, London

1989
Ergasterion, Anima Mundi, touring show organised by the Canadian Museum of Contemporary Photography
Anima Mundi, Stills Gallery, Edinburgh
Zelda Cheatle Gallery, London
Metamorphosis of the Image, Athens Biennale of Photography
It's a still-life, Arts Council Collection touring exhibition, The South Bank Centre (catalogue)

1988
Clayworks, Manchester City Art Gallery (catalogue)
The Subversive Stitch, Cornerhouse, Manchester

1987
The State of the Nation, Herbert Art Gallery, Coventry
TSWA 3D, Dartmoor and other sites
Painting Photography Painting, Pomeroy Gallery, London
Basel Art Fair (Gimpel Fils), Whitechapel Open

1986
Third Generation: Women Sculptors Today, Canterbury Arts Festival
New British Sculpture, AIR Gallery, London (catalogue)
Whitechapel Open
Objects as Art, Plymouth Arts Centre (catalogue)
No Place like Home, Cornerhouse, Manchester
Pink for a girl, blue for a boy, Dean Clough, Halifax
Next Tomorrow, Kettle's Yard, Cambridge

1985
Sculptors at Work, Canterbury Arts Festival
Revisions, Cambridge Darkroom; Watershed, Bristol and John Hansard Gallery, Southampton (catalogue)
Rituals, Brewery Arts Centre, Kendal
Fresh Air, St. Paul's Gallery, Leeds
Five Women, Howard Gardens Gallery, Cardiff

1984
Multiples, Photographer's Gallery, London
Sequences, Cambridge Darkroom (catalogue)
Dog Works, Interim Art, London

1983
Postcard Views
, Chapter Arts Centre, Cardiff

1982
Summer Show, Serpentine Gallery, London
Houses and Homes, Arnolfini, Bristol

1982
Strategies, John Hansard Gallery, Southampton
The South Bank Show, South London Art Gallery/Coracle Press (catalogue)

1981
Tolly Cobbold Eastern Arts, Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge
Whitechapel Open, London

1981
Spatialists, ffotogallery, Cardiff
The Arts Council Collection, Hayward Gallery, London
Photography as medium, The British Council (catalogue)

1979
Elise Meyer Gallery, New York
Anthony Stokes, London
New Contemporaries, Acme Gallery, London